022511

25 Feb

I failed to mention in the last installment that Persephone is my would-be rose perfume. I’m using araucaria and rose in the heart, and rosewood and palmarosa on top, out of 17 notes. It needs a fair amount more work until I can consider it a success. Also, I was mistaken with Hermes. My formula calls for linden-blossom absolute and green cognac in the base, araucaria and boronia in the heart, and linden-blossom essential oil, orange essence, and lime essence on top, out of 14 notes. The tea-tree/eucalyptus perfume is called Artemis; it’s also got rosemary absolute and mushroom in the base, calamus and jonquil in the heart, and rosemary essential oil and hops on top (hops, I’ve never used before, though I’ve had it for years), out of 17 notes.

The idea of using, say, linden absolute in the base and linden essential oil on top in one perfume, and rosemary absolute in the base along with rosemary essential oil on top, is something I’ve never tried. I imagine it will work nicely. I like the idea of a linden-blossom perfume; rosemary, not so much, but it’s worth a try. How well rosemary absolute and rosemary essential oil will work with tea-tree and eucalyptus remains to be seen. That’ll be my “outlaw perfume,” Artemis. I am truly an outlaw perfumer because I don’t care at all about conventional wisdom. Everything I’ve learned about natural-perfumery has been through experimentation, trial, and error. My knowledge has been hard-won. No one could take it away from me; no one could tell me that my methods are not conventional–I mean, they’re not, but I just don’t care.

One thing I plan to do is one day to make perfumed-leather journal covers. GW Septimus Piesse, in his book from 1857, has a recipe; he calls it “peau d’espange.” The instructions are complex: first you have to soak the leather in aromatics for a day; then you have to make a funky paste with civet and musk (I’d use ambergris), along with gum acacia or gum tragacanth. Spread that over small pieces of leather, sandwich them together, weigh them down with some kind of weight, and you’re on your way to peau d’espagne. Once you scrape off the paste, and, I assume, rinse the leather somehow, you have Piesse’s idea of pea d’espagne. I’d have to change some things about the recipe. I wouldn’t use civet, and I might change a couple of other aromatics. Another thing I want to do someday is sell perfumed letter paper; guys, I don’t think, would go for it; women on the other hand, would probably buy up perfumed letter paper as fast as I could make it. Piesse seems to write that perfuming letter paper can be difficult; perfumed bookmarks, however, he approves of.

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2 Responses to “022511”

  1. Tanja Bochnig May 15, 2011 at 9:25 pm #

    Hello Adam,

    Nice blog, love to read through your notes.
    May I ask you what you mean with Linden essential oil? I only come across the Linden abs. that I have to dilute in alcohol. And I am awaiting a shipment of Linden from Bulgaria. Is that what you mean?

    And I also agree with your price quoting, its really quite difficult to determine that correctly. I will also go back for my alc. perfumes and recalculate every gr. and ingredient. Quite a job, but necessary, esp when you are working with distributors and WS that are pressing your prices to the low minimum. It got to be worth our while, ingredients and time.

    Greetings from Berlin,
    Tanja

    • Adam Gottschalk May 15, 2011 at 9:42 pm #

      I have linden-blossom absolute diluted to 30% in FCO (a base note) from White Lotus Aromatics; I also have linden-blossom essential oil (a top note) from Mandy Aftel. I have yet to try either one out, but I’m looking forward to it. Cheers from Land O Lakes, Florida.

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